The First “Iranian-Armenian” in America

For many Iranians, the question of “belonging” in the United States has been a fraught one because of the volatile situation the community has faced in recent decades. This antagonism towards Iranians has perhaps incidentally covered up the long connection between the United States and Iran: the fact that there have been Iranians in the United States since the 1600s.
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Scholarship in the Service of Empire: The Legacy of Ann K.S. Lambton in 20th Century Iran

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Adam Becker on Assyrians, Evangelicals, and Borderland Nationalism

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Picturing the Other: Race and Afro-Iranians in Documentary Photography

These types of documentary ventures, both filmic and photographic, identify a racialized community as their subject, visibly recognizable by their visual characteristics. Despite this clear reliance on race, there is rarely much attention given to the issue of race itself. Instead, most tend to emphasize successful assimilation predicated on nationalist sentiments and champion the diversity of these communities. By ignoring race and its relationship to photography, we overlook crucial elements that have structured similar stories in the past.
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Farzin Vejdani on “Making History in Iran: Education, Nationalism, and Print Culture”

The latest in our Emerging Scholarship series, we spoke with Dr. Farzin Vejdani about history and history-making in Iran during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Dr. Vejdani describes the changing nature of Iranian historiography from court histories to national ones, while also elucidating the roles women and foreigners had in Iranian history-making. Dr. Vejdani is an Assistant Professor of History at Ryerson University in Toronto.
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